World Lang & Lit: Lit English (WLL)

WLL 231 -  Mystery Fiction Around the World  
Credits: 3  

Mystery fiction defies national boundaries. This course investigates the origins of the genre (Edgar Allan Poe) in English speaking countries and its transformation in the 1960s in noir . Considering examples from China, Japan, Italy, Spain, Mexico, French Canada, and Germany, the course explores both the common thread that unifies crime fiction around the world and its regional distinctions.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement.  
WLL 232 -  Lived Experiences: Latinx Feminism  
Credits: 2  

Introduction to the creative and theoretical writings of self-described feminist Latinx authors. Starting with the well-established "mestiza" and border theories of Gloria Anzaldúa, students will read about what it means to live within multiple identities and mixed cultures. Through personal narratives--in many cases stories of loss and absence--students will explore how contemporary Latinx philosophers and theorists are reclaiming the notion of experience to promote consciousness-raising and activism.

Prerequisites: SSP 100. Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfill Bridge Experience and, Humanistic Inquiry requirements.)  
WLL 233 -  Multilingual America  
Credits: 3  

An interdisciplinary exploration of language as a dimension of community, identity, and power in the United States. Explores the history of English and linguistic diversity in the U.S., with particular emphasis on contemporary multilingual communities. Draws on applied linguistics, sociolinguistics, and raciolinguistics to interpret contemporary representations of multilingual and multicultural American experiences, considering the interplay of language with race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, regional identity, etc. Students will conduct ethnographic interviews to better understand the intersections of language, identity, and power in their own communities. The significance of English and of multilingualism in the globalized economy will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Bridge Experience and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
WLL 237 -  Becoming "Asian": Asian American Cultural Representations and Identities  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of the identity formation and ongoing experiences of Asian Americans in American society. Students will examine how Asian Americans have been racialized, gendered, and sexualized in American culture both historically and contemporaneously, and what these cultural representations reveal about issues of identity, belonging, class, and citizenship in American society and the globalized world. Students will read stories written by Japanese/American writers on a variety of topics including immigration, labor, family, community, sexuality, militarism, globalization, and social movements while examining them through an intersectional lens.

Prerequisites: SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Culture Diversity and Humanities requirements; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry, Global Cultural Perspectives, and Bridge Experience requirements.  
WLL 238 -  Out of Home/Place: Chinese-American Experiences and Writing in Diaspora  
Credits: 4  

An introduction to literary and cinematic texts by Chinese-American diaspora writers in North America from the nineteenth century to the present. The course will help students understand transnational and transcultural themes and issues in the Chinese-American milieu through literature and films. By focusing on the role of English as a chosen literary language, the course will allow students to discover the history of immigration, linguistic choices and possibilities, and the form of narrative. Students will leave the class with a better understanding of power and justice in the Chinese-American context. We will examine cultural formation and the construction of global identities through cultural narratives as lived experiences. Students will be interviewing Chinese-Americans and creating short podcasts and documentaries using the materials in their interviews. Those student projects will be shared in the Saratoga Springs community and as exhibitions at the Tang Museum.

Prerequisites: SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Non-Western Cultures and Humanities requirements; fulfills Bridge Experience and Humanistic Inquiry requirements.  
WLL 239 -  Japanese Popular Culture  
Credits: 4  

This introductory course on Japanese society and culture explores Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, cultural industries, fan communities, and contemporary societal issues. Topics include Japanese popular music, karaoke, popular arts, manga (Japanese comics), sports, anime (Japanese animation), television programs, street fashion and fashion designers, among others. Emphasis will be given to contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, class, nationalism, and the workings of power in global cultural industries.

Note(s): Fulfills non-Western Cultures requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
WLL 241 -  Pre-Modern Japanese Literature in Translation  
Credits: 3  

Students will read and discuss poetry, prose, and performance works of the Nara (710-794) to Edo (1615-1867) periods. They will trace the development of Japanese culture and literature from early history to modern times. Students will examine the broad themes of pre-Modern Japanese literature in historical, cultural, religious, and sociopolitical contexts.

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 242 -  Modern Japanese Literature in Translation  
Credits: 3  

A critical survey of modern Japanese prose literature in English translation beginning with the Meiji period and continuing to the present. Students will study the interaction of traditional Japanese sensibilities with Western literary ideas and techniques as represented in major literary movements in Japan. Works will be discussed in terms of their cultural, historical, and literary contexts.

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 243 -  The World of Japanese Animation  
Credits: 4  

An introduction to the world of Japanese animation (anime), one of the most important cultural products in contemporary Japan. Students will study prevailing themes and genres of anime, in their cultural and historical contexts and from a variety of perspectives. The course also focuses on anime in relation to popular culture and the role of anime fan culture.

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 244 -  Viewing China: Visual Cultural and Transnational Cinema  
Credits: 4  

An examination of masterworks of Chinese film and visual culture viewed within their cultural context and in light of both Chinese and Western literary traditions. Students will consider ways in which Chinese film has represented national identity, national trauma, and national history, and how globalization has given birth to a new transnational Chinese cinema. The course will address cinema as narrative, and in relation to visual art, music, psychology, and cultural history.  Course includes a film screening and discussion session each week. It does not require knowledge of East Asian languages.

Note(s): Fulfills non-Western Cultures and Humanities requirements; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
WLL 245 -  China and the West: The Myth of the Other  
Credits: 3  

Introduces and examines the experience of "the other" from both Chinese and Western standpoints. The image of the other has always been historically shaped to represent values that are considered different from one's own. In this course, we will look at China as an idealized utopia in the eyes of some eighteenth-century Europeans, or as a land of ignorance as described in some early modern literature and cultural texts. In discussing such issues as Orientalism vs. Occidentalism and cultural relativism vs. universalism, we will examine the polemics of cultural difference in ethical terms.

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 246 -  Fictional and Factual: History and the Novel in China  
Credits: 3  

Examines several Chinese works of literature in terms of their special narrative modes, considering how each reveals the changing history of modern China and exploring how each makes its unique contribution to Chinese literature. Issues discussed include history in literature, history outside literature, literary histories, factual and fictional as literary categories, and the historical novel. Throughout the course, we will ask, Why is the novel a particularly valid source for the study of Chinese history?

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course, fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 247 -  Japanese Woman: Gender, Gender Relations, and Sexuality in Contemporary Japan  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of gender, gender relation, and sexuality in contemporary Japan. Topics include history, family, work, education, language, religion, politics, homosexuality, sex work, and popular culture.

Note(s): Fulfills non-Western and social science requirements; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 248 -  Muslims in the New Europe  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of one of the most hotly debated public policy issue in Western-Europe today: the challenges of (im)migration and accommodation of national, ethnic, cultural and religious diversity. Focusing on the Muslim immigrant minority mainly in Germany, France, and the United Kingdom, this course introduces students to the current debates about European immigration, multiculturalism, integration and citizenship, as well as individual experiences represented through literature and film.

Note(s): Fulfills global cultural perspective.  
WLL 249 -  Image of the Enemy in German Film 1919-1945  
Credits: 4  

Students will examine the changing image of the enemy in German cinema from 1919 to 1945. From its silent beginnings through the invention of sound, German cinema abounds in archetypal figures of unearthly destruction and social deviants from an equally hostile present. Nazi propaganda films adopted both realistic and mythic traditions to construct an image of the enemy threatening the survival of the Third Reich, and they became a powerful weapon in disseminating fascist ideology. Viewing film as a symbolic language which inscribes cultural identity, we will explore anti-Semitism, xenophobia, jingoism, misogyny, and fascism as well as changes in the public perception of the enemy that contributed to World War II and the Holocaust.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 250 -  An Outline of German Civilization: The Eighteenth Century to the Present  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of German life, culture, and politics from the eighteenth century to the present. The course focuses on Germany's quest for national unity, emphasizing the relationship between Germany's political development and its cultural life. Course materials include historical readings, political essays, musical compositions, art works, films, and literary texts. Offered in alternate years.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 251 -  Contemporary German Cinema  
Credits: 4  

A study of German cinema from the turn of the millennium until today as a vehicle to understand recent developments in the German culture. Students will examine how films engage with significant issues in contemporary German culture and society while viewing motion pictures as both daydreams of society and instruments of social change. Topics in this course will include the pleasures and pitfalls of urban life in the Berlin Republic, the complications of modern love and sexuality, the violence of Germany's past (Third Reich, GDR, leftwing terrorism), the desire for utopian solutions to social and economic inequities, and the problems of a multicultural, multiethnic society.

Note(s): Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
WLL 252 -  Italian Cinema: From Fiction to Film  
Credits: 4  

An examination of the literary and sociopolitical trends of Italian culture as portrayed by the media of literature and film. The course will focus on the literary works of Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Moravia, De Filippo, Bassani, and the cinematographic adaptations of those works by such directors as Pasolini, Lattuada, Visconti, and De Sica. The course also specifically examines the role in Italian cinema of such director-authors as Fellini and Wertmuller and the importance of Italian cinematic Neorealism in the films of Rossellini, De Sica, and Visconti. Offered in 2011-12 and alternate years.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 253 -  Italian Civilization in Translation  
Credits: 3  

Study of the development of Italian civilization with emphasis on the historical, artistic, philosophical, literary, musical, and sociopolitical background. Fall semester: late Medieval period to the Baroque. Spring semester: seventeenth century to the present.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement.  
WLL 255 -  Introduction to Film Theory and Criticism  
Credits: 4  

A survey of major developments in film theory and methods of analyzing film from the invention of cinema to today. Working with the notion that cinema is an art form, a commodity, and a form of communication, we examine how historical, commercial, and aesthetic contexts influence film production and reception. Students read key texts in classical and contemporary film theory and criticism to develop an understanding of a film's narrative, visual structure, and place within established theoretical traditions. Subjects to be considered include formalism, realism, auteur theory, feminism, spectatorship, genre and star analysis, narratology, queer theory, cultural studies, post-colonialism, and critical race theory.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 256 -  Twenty-First Century Italian Movies  
Credits: 4  

An exploration of twenty-first century themes in Italian films. The narrative of Italian film in recent decades follows the development of social, cultural, political, and economic issues. Students view films which explore a series of thematic clusters: social change and urban challenge, work scene and workplace, politics and the media, immigration and integration, cultural revolution and terrorism, and organized crime. Critical materials contextualize the films and provide tools for interpretation and discussion. Students will explore different writing styles: analytical (considering both the visual text of the films and the prose of secondary sources), descriptive (in relation to historical analyses of the periods depicted), and creative (writing or re-writing a movie scene). The final project, a brief iMovie relating to Italy and a theme from the course, puts discussion into practice. In English.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 257 -  Modern Chinese Literature in Translation  
Credits: 3  

A critical survey of twentieth-century Chinese literature up to the present. Readings include short stories, novels, poetry, music, painting, and drama. Special emphasis is placed on Chinese thought and culture compared to the Western tradition.

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills humanities requirement.  
WLL 258 -  Chinese Civilization I: Literary Culture in Classical China  
Credits: 3  

A survey of Chinese civilization from the Shang dynasty to the present with emphasis on the historical, artistic, philosophical, literary, musical, sociopolitical background. Shang dynasty (1766 BC) to early tenth century. WLL 258 and WLL 259 need not be taken in sequence.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 259 -  Chinese Civilization II: Culture and Literature of Late Imperial China  
Credits: 3  

A survey of Chinese civilization from the Shang dynasty to the present with emphasis on the historical, artistic, philosophical, literary, musical, sociopolitical background. Tenth century to the present.

Note(s): WLL 258 and WLL 259 need not be taken in sequence. Fulfills non-Western Cultures and Humanities requirements; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives requirement.  
WLL 263A-D -  Topics in Foreign Literature and Culture  
Credits: 1-4  

Literary or cultural study of an author, a genre, a period, or a topic. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Fulfills humanities requirement (3-4 credits). WLL 263N designates a non-Western course; fulfills global cultural perspective.

WLL 264 -  Maritime Asia: Diasporic Migrations and Cultural Encounters  
Credits: 4  

An exploration of the mobility of individuals and groups across maritime Asia with a focus on the travels of migrants in different times.  Special attention given to the changing dynamics between "center" and "periphery" through interdisciplinary lenses.  By looking at texts in geography, literature and trans-national culture in the past and more recently, we will study the multi-lingual, multiethnic encounters and interactions in maritime Asia and beyond. The course fulfills both the "global cultural perspectives" requirement and the requirement in "humanistic inquiry and practice" in the new Gen Ed Curriculum (or current humanities requirement and non-Western and cultural diversity requirements).     Fulfills non-western, cultural diversity and humanities requirements; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.

WLL 265 -  Latinos in the United States  
Credits: 3  

An examination from an interdisciplinary perspective of Hispanic society in the United States. Major Latino groups (e.g., Cubans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans) will be studied, and special attention will be given to the interaction between these groups and United States mainstream society. We will focus on the historical, sociological, literary, and political aspects of cultural change in contact situations. Particular attention will be paid to issues of prejudice and discrimination.

Note(s): Fulfills global cultural perspective.  
WLL 266 -  Images of Revolution and Social Upheaval: France 1789-1939  
Credits: 3  

Study through literary and historical texts, and via artistic representation of the experience and consequences of social change in France over a century and a half of upheaval. Beginning with the outbreak of revolution in 1789, we will analyze the effects on French culture of the long and tormented path leading to the establishment of Republicanism. Particular attention to the trials and tribulations of the Third Republic during the Dreyfus Affair and in the period between the world wars in order to discern the evolution of specific cultural tendencies over time. Taught in English.

Note(s): Fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 267 -  Modern Japanese Culture and Society  
Credits: 3  

A survey of modern Japanese culture and society from 1945 to the present. Students will analyze Japan's modernization and internationalization, paying attention to the interplay between traditional cultural values and modern society. Topics include class, work, education, gender, family, minority groups, religion, and politics. Visual media will be incorporated to illustrate contemporary Japanese society and culture.

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course, fulfills social sciences requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.  
WLL 269 -  Cultural China: Trends and Themes  
Credits: 3  

A course surveying twentieth-century Chinese literature, film, and popular culture, introducing some important cultural and intellectual issues of contemporary China. Students will consider the impact of cultural changes in Chinese society, their causes, and their representations in fiction, poetry, popular literature, film, and music. Students will gain a critical understanding of the intricate relationship between self and society, social change and alienation, family and gender relationships, nationalism and orientalism, revolution and memory, media and propaganda, and love and violence in China.

Note(s): Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills global cultural perspective.  
WLL 271 -  Directed Reading in WLL  
Credits: 1  

Discussion group for close reading and consideration of literary or theoretical texts, translations or research projects of interest to students in any section of the department of World Languages and Literatures.  The course enables students from different language areas to study together on topics of common interest in the field. Can be repeated for credit.

WLL 272 -  Directed Reading in WLL  
Credits: 1  

Discussion group for close reading and consideration of literary or theoretical texts, translations or research projects of interest to students in any section of the department of World Languages and Literatures.  The course enables students from different language areas to study together on topics of common interest in the field. Can be repeated for credit.

WLL 273 -  Dante's Divine Comedy  
Credits: 3  

An examination of Dante's Divine Comedy from an interdisciplinary perspective, including literature, history, politics, philosophy, and theology. Course topics will include concerns of the medieval world such as allegory, love, justice, secular and spiritual authority, images of women, education, and the relationship between philosophy and religion. Supplementary readings will provide a context for the medieval world, its life and literature, and will also demonstrate how Dante's text reflects the Zeitgeist of the Middle Ages. The course will also take into account Dante's Divine Comedy in relation to the visual arts by viewing several illustrations from Botticelli and Renaissance illustrators to Gustave Dore, and selected modern and contemporary paintings inspired by Dante's poem.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 275 -  The Study Abroad Experience  
Credits: 1  

Preparation for the study abroad experience through development of knowledge and skills to promote translingual and transcultural competence. Students will gain a deeper awareness of the concept of culture and acquire strategies for language and culture learning. Students will examine their own cultural identity and learning style as a point of departure for developing skills to maximize linguistic and cultural competence while abroad. This course is intended for students studying abroad where foreign languages are used.

WLL 300 -  Lit and Civ 300 Elec (In Eng)  
Credits: 3  
WLL 305 -  East Asian Cinema: History, Genres, and Waves  
Credits: 4  

An examination of the history, genres, and trends of East Asian cinemas.  Students will examine influential cinematic texts from the silent era to the present, including films produced in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.  Special attention is given to issues such as historical representation, various waves, local/transnational production and reception, postmodernism, and globalization of East Asian films. Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.

WLL 321 -  Women In France Since The Revolution  
Credits: 3  

Analysis of women writers and female stereotypes since the French Revolution as seen primarily through novels and plays of such writers as de Staël, Sand, Flaubert, Stendhal, Colette, Claudel, de Beauvoir, Duras, and Sarraute. Historical, sociological and artistic documents will also be examined for what they reveal of the changing consciousness of women in France. Offered every third year.

Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 322 -  The French Film  
Credits: 3  

Study of some of the key features of the cinema of France, beginning with an historical overview of the development of the idiom, from the silent films of the Surrealists and René Clair, to the Golden Age of sound in the thirties and concluding with the New Wave and its posterity. The course will also study film as a language and use it as a means for exploring cultural identity. Students will view a selection of films by Clair, Dali/Bunuel, Vigo, Renoir, Carne, Duvivier, Truffaut, Godard, Eustache, Tanner, and Rohmer, among others, and read criticism by directors, critics, and theorists.

Prerequisites: for credit in the French major, WLF 203 or WLF 206.   
Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 324 -  Race and Nature in French and Francophone Literatures and Cultures  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of the relationship between race and nature in Francophone literatures and cultures. Students will discuss how literary and visual cultures from and about French-speaking sub-Saharan and Caribbean spaces have grappled with the Anthropocene, which has disproportionately affected racialized communities around the globe for more than 400 years. This course will be of particular interest to students interested in/working on questions of environmental justice, environmental sciences, and sustainability. Pre-requisite: EN 105.

Note(s): Fulfills cultural diversity requirement; fulfills global cultural perspectives; fulfills humanistic inquiry.  
WLL 326 -  Suspected Whiteness: The Transatlantic Construction of Race in Spain  
Credits: 3  

A relatively small country in southern Europe, Spain offers a surprisingly nuanced context in which to study questions of race and ethnicity. This course enters into critical dialogue with films, theater, social media, and other types of performance that represent the construction of race at different history moments in Spain. We will look at texts that shore up hegemonic discourses of Spanish whiteness as well as texts that intervene in this discussion and consider to what degree they do so effectively. By reading Spanish texts in this course asks students to consider how learning about the Spanish context invites them to reflect on their own subject positions. The culminating project for this course will be a public-facing video essay that articulate issues relating race and ethnicity in Spain for a U.S. audience.

Prerequisites: SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Cultural Diversity and Humanities requirements; fulfills Bridge Experience, Global Cultural Perspectives, and Humanistic Inquiry requirements.  
WLL 363A-D -  Topics in Foreign Literature and Culture  
Credits: 1-4  

A detailed interdisciplinary exploration of an author, a genre, a period, or a topic. Topics will vary from semester to semester.   Fulfills humanities requirement (3-4 credits).

Note(s): Fulfills global cultural perspective.  
WLL 371A-D -  Independent Study: Language and Literature  
Credits: 1-4  

Individual study projects under the guidance of department.

WLL 376A-D -  Seminar (In English)  
Credits: 1-4  

A detailed exploration of a theme reflected in the cultures of Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish-speaking civilizations. Frequent oral reports in English by members of the class. Close attention to development, organization, and writing of an extensive paper. Can be repeated for credit. Fulfills humanities requirement.

WLL 376N -  Seminar (In English) NW  
Credits: 3  
WLL 399A-D -  Professional Internship in World Languages  
Credits: 1-4  

Professional experience at an advanced level for juniors and seniors with substantial academic and cocurricular experience in the major field. With faculty sponsorship and departmental approval, students may extend their educational experience into such areas as the communications fields, the media, pedagogy, and translation. Primarily but not exclusively for students participating in Skidmore's Junior Year Abroad programs.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing in the language appropriate to the internship.