Anthropology (AN)

AN 100 -  Anthropology Elective Credit  
Credits: 1-4  
AN 101 -  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology  
Credits: 3  

An overview of concepts, theories, and methods of cultural anthropology. Students learn about central anthropological topics, such as kinship, gender, class, race, environment, ritual and religion, ethnicity, economy, and politics, and gain understanding and appreciation for cultural differences.

Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
AN 101H -  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology  
Credits: 4  

An overview of concepts, theories, and methods of cultural anthropology. Students learn about central anthropological topics, such as kinship, gender, class, race, environment, ritual and religion, ethnicity, economy, and politics, and gain understanding and appreciation for cultural differences.

Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
AN 102 -  Anthropology of the Human Past  
Credits: 3  

An introduction to the biological and cultural evolution of humans. In learning about the origins of human diversity, students come to understand concepts of time, space, and context as critical factors in our ability to reconstruct the human past. Students engage in a variety of scientific evaluation sessions involving data common to archaeological analysis of human evolutionary and cultural change to learn how this reconstruction occurs. 

Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
AN 102H -  Honors: Anthropology of the Human Past  
Credits: 4  

An honors section introduction to the biological and cultural evolution of humans. In learning about the origins of human diversity, students come to understand concepts of time, space, and context as critical factors in our ability to reconstruct the human past. Students engage in a variety of scientific evaluation sessions involving data common to archaeological analysis of human evolutionary and cultural change to learn how this reconstruction occurs. Students learn about human and non-human primate adaptation to environment and culture and investigate cultural diversity in the past through lectures, hands-on lab activities, group research projects, and discussion of scientific articles.

Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
AN 200 -  200 Level Elective  
Credits: 3  
AN 201 -  Ethnographic Research Methods  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of the research methods anthropologists use to collect ethnographic data. Students conduct ethnographic projects in local community settings and collect primary data using a variety of techniques, including mapping, interviewing, participant observation, and photography. In the process, students gain experience in formulating research questions, designing an ethnographic project, and analyzing results. Students also learn guidelines for establishing rapport with research participants and for applying anthropology's code of ethics. Special attention is given to organizing and communicating findings orally and in writing.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102 .   
Note(s): Anthropology students are recommended to complete the course prior to carrying out ethnographic research in a 300-level course or while studying abroad.  
AN 202 -  Archaeological Field Methods  
Credits: 3  

An introduction to the methodological and theoretical approaches by which archaeologists recover, analyze, and interpret the material remains of the past. Students engage in excavation and investigation of an archaeological site. The course provides training in anthropological data-collection techniques, including research design, site survey, artifact recovery, recording methods, and mapping activities, followed by laboratory analysis and interpretation. Students also learn to differentiate theses, methods, and data in anthropological writing.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102. (Fulfills Scientific Inquiry requirement).   
AN 203 -  Introduction to Archaeological Research  
Credits: 2  

An introduction to the basic lab methods and theory involved in organizing, describing, and analyzing archaeological data. Course work is project-based, involves analysis of primary data, and results in generating answers to central research questions about these data.

Prerequisites: AN 102.   
AN 205 -  Mesoamerican Archaeology  
Credits: 3  

A survey of the culture history of Mesoamerica, including primarily the states of Mexico and Guatemala. Inquiry focuses on the origin of New World agriculture as well as the development of highland Mexican and Aztec and lowland Mayan civilizations. The course considers the interpretation of the archaeological remains at major Mesoamerican site complexes.

Note(s): Fulfills Non-Western Cultures and Social Sciences requirements; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
AN 207 -  North American Archaeology  
Credits: 3  

An introduction to the historical depth and variety of cultures that characterize human settlement in North America prior to Columbus's "discovery" of it. An explicitly ecological framework is applied to an analysis of the development of regionally diverse cultures. Contemporary issues involved with the interpretation of Native traditions through archeology are also considered. An explicitly comparative framework developed through the course enables students to arrive at a number of seminal cross-regional generalizations.

Note(s): Fulfills non-Western Cultures and Social Sciences requirements; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
AN 208 -  Archaeology of the American Southwest  
Credits: 3  

An introduction to archaeological discoveries of prehistoric and protohistoric populations in the ancient American Southwest.  To learn about the origins of agriculture, architectural and ritual change, and conflict in the region, students will examine cultural diversity from Paleoindians to pre-contact Puebloan populations, hunter-gatherers to agriculturalists, and indigenous groups ranging from northern Mexico to southern Utah.   Students will also discuss and debate archaeological data regarding themes such as occupation patterns, migration, material culture, violence, and adaptations to climate change in arid environments. 

Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. Fulfills Social Sciences and non-Western Cultures requirements; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives and Humanistic Inquiry requirements.  
AN 209 -  New Europe: French Identities in Comparative Perspective  
Credits: 3  

An examination of how citizens of European Union countries claim different national identities in multicultural societies. Using anthropological perspectives, students analyze how Europeans create and express ethnic identities related to race, class, gender, and religion. The course begins with an examination of French multiculturalism in the midst of increasing immigration from predominately Islamic countries in Africa, including former French colonies. Students compare similar cultural dynamics related to immigrants arriving in other Western European countries.  Comparisons focus on understanding Islamophobia, racism, power and justice, the politics of artistic representations, and anti-discrimination activism.

Prerequisites: AN 101 or permission of instructor.   
Note(s): Fulfills Cultural Diversity requirement; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives requirement.  
AN 221 -  Visual Anthropology  
Credits: 3  

The study of the principles for thinking visually and creating images to present ethnographic data, with an emphasis on photography and videos. Students will examine the ethics of images, cameras in social science research, organizing images, and analyzing images. Students will also design short visual ethnography projects to gain experience in formulating research questions, visual ethnography, and analyzing and presenting results.

Prerequisites: AN 101 or AN 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Science requirement.  
AN 222 -  You Are What You Eat: Food and Culture  
Credits: 4  

An anthropological exploration of the food we eat.  Food is not only a necessary aspect of our survival, but also of  great importance to our cultural identities, economies, and political systems.  Students will explore the ways that food choice, production, and consumption contribute to disparities in health and socioeconomic status in the United States. We will also examine modern problems--including obesity and diet-related diseases, sustainability in food production, famines, and the loss of food variety.  Students will engage with local food systems to better understand the impacts of power and inequality among their peers and neighbors.

Prerequisites: SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Bridge Experience requirement.  
AN 224 -  Perspectives from Asia  
Credits: 3  

An anthropological examination of contemporary "Asia" by engaging themes of postcolonialism, orientalism, nationalism, and globalization. The course deconstructs and moves beyond caricatures of Asia to investigate the political and cultural complexities that belie any homogeneous understanding of this very diverse region.

Note(s): Fulfills non-Western Cultures and Social Sciences requirements; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
AN 226 -  Archaeology of Inequality  
Credits: 4  

Archaeology of Inequality- An exploration of how the material world creates or reinforces inequality and the ways that historical archaeologists combine documentary and material evidence to understand how inequalities are enacted, reproduced, and challenged in the United States. Through readings, discussions, and hands-on work with material culture collections and archives, students gain an understanding of the roots of present day inequalities, the material conditions of inequalities, and archaeology's contribution to making both visible in the 21st century. Students will use an anthropological approach to analyze case studies, situating and interpreting material objects in their social, political, and economic contexts to better understand people and their relationship to power, justice, and identity. They will further consider how gender, race, class, ethnicity, and identity intersect and shape individual and community experiences of power, justice, and inequality. Students will also examine how archaeology is used to combat inequality in the 21st century U.S.

Prerequisites: SSP 100   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Bridge Experience requirement.  
AN 227 -  Sub-Saharan Africa from a Cultural Perspective  
Credits: 3  

A survey of Africa south of the Sahara Desert from a cultural perspective. Students learn about the cultural diversity, historical depth, and global interconnections of sub-Saharan Africa, and examine topics of importance to understanding present and past realities in Africa. Topics include notions of time, space, and person, ethnicity, ritual and religion, art, history, and governance .

Prerequisites: AN 101.   
Note(s): Fulfills non-Western Cultures requirement; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives and Humanistic Inquiry requirements.  
AN 229 -  Mexican Cultures  
Credits: 3  

A survey of the peoples and cultures of Mexico. The course examines the changes in Mexican cultures in relation to European conquest and colonization, national independence, the Revolution, and relations with the United States. Topics include social movements of principal indigenous groups (such as Nahuatl, Maya, and Zapotecs), contemporary regional politics, environmental change, and the ongoing construction of Mexican identities.

Prerequisites: AN 101 or AN 205 or permission of instructor.   
Note(s): Fulfills Cultural Diversity requirement; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives requirement.  
AN 231V -  Anthropology of Food  
Credits: 4  
AN 232 -  Forensic Anthropology: Bones, Bodies, and Trauma  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of the analysis of decomposed or skeletonized human remains in forensic death investigations.  Students will be introduced to the medico-legal investigation system, human skeletal anatomy, and the role and responsibilities of the professional forensic anthropologist.  Students will learn about the biological processes of decomposition, taphonomy, and recovery of remains. Methods of skeletal analysis will introduce the biological profile and teach the student to establish sex, age, stature, and ancestry and to identify pathology and trauma.

Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
AN 234R -  Anthr Globalization:East Asia  
Credits: 4  
AN 235 -  Culture, Illness, and Healing  
Credits: 4  

An exploration of the human experience of illness and healing in a cross-cultural perspective.  Using case studies to compare the United States with diverse world regions, students examine how patterns of human suffering emerge from interrelated biological, social, and cultural factors. Special attention is given to anthropological perspectives of health disparities and efforts to foster health equity and justice among poor and powerless social groups. Students learn cultural concepts to understand global health problems and to compare healing practices used by family caregivers, traditional healers, community health workers, and biomedical specialists.  Topics include reproductive health, infectious disease, chronic illness, environmental health, mental illness, and aging. Students complete applied ethnographic projects to understand how social and cultural diversity affect access to complementary and alternative medicine in a contemporary US context.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Bridge Experience requirement.  
AN 236 -  Migration and Diaspora  
Credits: 4  

Anthropological examination of population movements around the globe, including voluntary and forced migration, displacement, diaspora, and refugee flows. Students will analyze the underlying political, economic, and social dynamics of both internal and international migrations, examine the personal and cultural experience of movement in relation to power and violence, and assess international policies and efforts to address mobility. Students will also consider connections between conflict and humanitarianism, urban displacement, the effects of climate change, the formation of refugee identities, and the social and economic relations of diasporas with their home communities.

Prerequisites: AN 101 or AN 101H or AN 101W or IA 101 or SO 101 and SSP 100  
Note(s): Fulfills Cultural Diversity and Social Sciences requirements; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives and Bridge Experience requirements.  
AN 237 -  Origins and Evolution of Violence  
Credits: 3  

An examination of violence as a social practice across culture and time.  Using anthropological methods and perspectives, students learn theories of the origins of violence among Homo sapiens and our primate ancestors as well as how culture creates and perpetuates meaning in violent acts. Readings and discussions explore the cultural variation of violence at collective and individual levels and differentiate warfare from violence as a broader concept. Through archaeological and biological data, students learn how agency, identity, and performance play a role in the use and avoidance of violence across time, physical environments, and sociopolitical contexts.

Note(s): Fulfills non-Western Cultures and Social Sciences requirements; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
AN 251A-D -  Themes in Anthropology  
Credits: 1-4  

Examination of a geographic or subject area not available in existing course offerings. For example, the course may focus on post-colonial Australia, contemporary Ireland, or studies in primate behavior.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.   
Note(s): Course may be repeated for credit in a different subject area.  
AN 251E -  Themes in Anthropology  
Credits: 4  

Examination of a geographic or subject area not available in existing course offerings. For example, the course may focus on post-colonial Australia, contemporary Ireland, or studies in primate behavior.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. The course in a different subject area may be repeated for credit.  
AN 252A-D -  Non-Western Themes in Anthropology  
Credits: 1-4  

Examination of a non-Western geographic or subject area not available in existing course offerings. For example, the course may focus on aboriginal Australia or the music of New Guinea tribal groups.

Note(s): The course in a different subject area may be repeated for credit.  
AN 270 -  History of Anthropological Thought  
Credits: 4  

An inquiry into the central theoretical perspectives, questions, and developments that informed the history of anthropology from the nineteenth-century theories of evolution to the crisis of representation in the 1980s. Focusing on significant scholars and case studies from cultural anthropology, this course explores the different ways in which anthropologists have formulated and understood fundamental questions concerning humanity, culture, and society. Students examine the historical, institutional, and sociopolitical processes that informed theoretical approaches, and study the interconnections among scholars, theories, and concepts. By learning this intellectual heritage, students deepen their understanding of the issues and debates that inform anthropology today. This course challenges students to think and write conceptually, helping them to strengthen their writing in anthropology as preparation for completing the writing requirement in the major. Writing assignments and their evaluation are consistent with the guidelines for Skidmore's writing enhanced courses. This course is designed for majors.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102.  
AN 300 -  300 Level Elective  
Credits: 3  
AN 304 -  Human Osteology  
Credits: 4  

An introduction to how skeletal data are applied in various contexts including bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology, paleoanthropology, and medical anthropology.  The course surveys the human skeletal system and its role in human biological function as it has evolved from our hominid ancestors.  Topics covered include cellular structure of bone, form vs. function, basic skeletal identification of features, and bone trauma/pathology.  Students will learn methods of analysis through hands-on observation of skeletal material.  Completion of this course will prepare students to further explore evolutionary topics, life history theory, adaptation, and the impacts of biocultural processes (such as environmental, cultural, or biological change) on human health and survival.

Prerequisites: AN 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills Natural Sciences requirement; fulfills Scientific Inquiry requirement. Must be taken for a letter grade.  
AN 305 -  Bioarchaeology  
Credits: 4  

An exploration of human skeletal remains and their interpretation in archaeological contexts.  Bio-archaeologists take an interdisciplinary approach to learn about human behavior in the past, using data and theoretical perspectives from both the natural and social sciences.  Students will learn how deposits of human bones are contextualized within the local culture and environment to reveal the lifestyle and experiences of individuals and communities.  Topics include population-level analysis, adaptations to stress, manifestations of violence, the body as material culture, and ethics in research.  Students completing the course will be prepared to further investigate people in the past either through archaeological excavation, collections-based research, or in advanced academic settings. 

Prerequisites: AN 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
AN 307 -  Power and Violence  
Credits: 3  

An anthropological exploration of power and violence in the contemporary world. Students will explore the societal roots of power and violence, how power relations shift over space and time, and how people articulate power and violence in cross-cultural contexts. In addition to the traditionally understood forms of physical violence in times of conflict or war, students will also examine the structural, symbolic, and everyday forms of violence that are often invisible and unrecognized during times of peace.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives and Humanistic Inquiry requirements.  
AN 322 -  Sports in the Americas  
Credits: 3  

An examination of sports from an anthropological perspective using case studies, cultural studies, and history to critically investigate sporting culture. Students conduct anthropological research on sport and discuss current cultural trends in the sporting world. Geographic focus centers on North and South America with a particular focus on Latin America and the Caribbean. 

Prerequisites: AN 101 or AN 102 and SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Cultural Diversity and Social Sciences requirements; fulfills Bridge Experience and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
AN 323R -  Heritage & Communities  
Credits: 4  

Examination of how heritage is used to empower and disempower contemporary communities (global, local, Indigenous, descendant, diasporic). Students critically examine the ideas, theories, methods, and questions that shape efforts to protect and interpret cultural heritage and how these are impacted by modern society. Students will explore and debate issues such as current threats, ideas of universal value, the role of tourism, impacts of development, questions of authenticity and identity, international law, and ethics. Practical considerations such as public policy, international organizations, and legal frameworks are examined alongside factors such as colonialism, nationalism, and conflict. Students will conduct research and work on a real-world heritage project.

Prerequisites: AN 101 or AN 102. Fulfills social sciences requirement.  
AN 324 -  Urban Anthropology  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of culture in contemporary urban spaces through ethnography and film. Students will learn the main theoretical frameworks anthropologists use to study how urban life relates to national, transnational, and global forces. Students will deconstruct urban terminology (e.g. metropolitan, ghetto, city, and neighborhood) to decipher the complex relationship between urban inhabitants and urban infrastructure. Students will examine education, drugs, and poverty in urban centers, especially in regards to youth. They will also explore how cities, neighborhoods, and residents prepare for global events, respond to globalization, develop distinct cultures, and address current issues.

Prerequisites: AN 101 or AN 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills Cultural Diversity and Social Sciences requirements; fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives requirement.  
AN 325 -  Applied Anthropology  
Credits: 4  
AN 328 -  Built Environments: Archaeology of Architecture  
Credits: 3  

An examination of the ways in which cultural values and belief systems are encoded in architecture and the problems that exist in interpreting these patterns. Students will use various sources of evidence (e.g., site plans, maps, artifacts, texts) to explore architecture and what it can tell us about different aspects of human society. Students will examine topics that include both practical and symbolic perspectives on the selection of building materials, the relation of activities and social roles to spatial constructions, the interplay between environment and architecture, the destruction and/or abandonment of spaces, and constructions for the supernatural and the afterlife. 

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102.  
AN 329 -  Imaging & Imagining the Past: Visual Representation in Archaeology  
Credits: 4  

This course will examine aspects of representation in anthropological discourse, such as gendered perspectives in images of our hominin ancestors, changing criteria behind National Geographic’s iconic photography, and the ethics of creating virtual realities of past peoples. The course focuses on the power relationships embedded in images presenting “truth” about past peoples and contemporary identities will be a focus of this course. Peoples, places, and events of the past are frequently presented to the public in visual format: drawings, paintings, photographs, maps, models, tables and graphs, film, recreations, and virtual reality. Representation is readily interpreted as “truth,” but accuracy in these images varies widely. Students will have hands-on experience in how we represent the past by translating artifacts to scientific drawing, and then on to create reconstructions.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102 and SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Bridge Experience requirement.  
AN 331 -  Reimagining Museums  
Credits: 4  

A critical reflection on the history of museums and the role they play today. Through a combination of conceptual readings, museum case studies, and class visits to museum exhibitions and collections, at Skidmore College and beyond, this course encourages students to see present museums as points of tension between their colonial past and their uncertain future.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills Social Sciences requirement; fulfills Bridge Experience requirement.  
AN 342 -  Global Mental Health  
Credits: 3  

Examination of global mental health from an anthropological perspective. Students study medical anthropology theories that interconnect biological, social, and cultural aspects of mental illness, particularly among vulnerable populations. Course materials focus on common mental disorders, including depression, anxiety disorders, trauma-related disorders, and addiction. Students analyze ethnographic case studies of mental health experiences and treatment in diverse social contexts, such as displacement (of refugees and migrants), water insecurity, disaster recovery, and military conflict. Course discussions foster understanding of traditional versus biomedical beliefs about mental illness, intersections of mind and body, and access to health care. The course also considers how community-based and humanitarian interventions aim to improve mental health and advance global health equity.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and An 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills Global Cultural Perspectives requirement.  
AN 343 -  Ritual and Religion  
Credits: 3  

A study of religion from an anthropological perspective with a focus on ritual practices in non-Western cultural contexts. Students learn key conceptual and theoretical contributions in the anthropological study of ritual and religion, a fundamental dimension of human cultural practice the world over. Students explore religion as a way of reasoning, a form of ritual action, and an experiential reality. Topics include fetishism, symbolism, embodiment, ritual action, divination, initiation, and healing. 

Prerequisites: AN 101.  
AN 346 -  Rethinking Materiality: The Anthropology of Stuff  
Credits: 3  

An exploration of the importance of material objects in human life and the ways in which cultural anthropologists and other scholars have contributed to the study of materiality, a highly interdisciplinary field of research. In this seminar, drawing on case studies from different times and places, students learn to recognize the importance of material objects in the social world and their own lives. How do objects help people define their identity, structure their lives, remember the past, and facilitate action? What personal and collective stories do objects tell? Do we control the objects around us, or do those objects control us? Among the types of objects studied in this course are sentimental objects, collectibles, memorials, protest art, and technology.

Prerequisites: AN 101.  
AN 348R -  Anthropology of the Body  
Credits: 4  
AN 349 -  Medical Anthropology  
Credits: 3  

A survey of the field of medical anthropology with a focus on the cross-cultural study of the body, health, disease, illness, suffering, and healing.  Students examine and apply several theoretical perspectives, including biocultural, interpretive, critical, and political economic.  We analyze ethnographic studies of birthing, maternal and child health, emerging diseases, death and dying, and other issues across the human life cycle in diverse geographic settings.

Prerequisites: AN 101 and AN 102.  
AN 351A-D -  Topics in Cultural Anthropology  
Credits: 1-4  

Examination of a theoretical or subject specialization (with a strong theoretical component) not available in existing course offerings. For example, the course may focus on the anthropology of tourism or inequality.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.   
Note(s): The course in a different subject area may be repeated for credit.  
AN 351H -  Topics in Cultural Anthropology  
Credits: 4  

Examination of a theoretical or subject specialization (with a strong theoretical component) not available in existing course offerings. For example, the course may focus on the anthropology of tourism or inequality.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. The course, in a different subject area, may be repeated for credit.  
AN 352A-D -  Topics in Archeology  
Credits: 1-4  

Examination of a theoretical or area specialization not available in existing course offerings. For example, the course may focus on zooarchaeology or lithic technology.

Note(s): The course in a different subject area may be repeated for credit.  
AN 353A-D -  Topic Biological Anthropology  
Credits: 1-4  

Examination of a theoretical or subject specialization (with a strong theoretical component) not available in existing course offerings. For example, the course may focus on the behavior of macaques or the etiology of disease in humans.

Note(s): The course in a different subject area may be repeated for credit.  
AN 364 -  Archaeological Collections and Curation  
Credits: 3  

A hands-on introduction to the principles and methods of archaeological collections management and care. Topics include legal responsibilities, archaeological standards, collection policies, proper housing and conservation, cataloging systems, and digital records management with an emphasis on practical application and increasing the accessibility of collections. Students will work with artifacts and documentation from the Skidmore Archaeological Collection of Native American material culture to learn techniques and apply best practices of curation. Students will work with artifacts including stone, pottery, glass, and animal bone.

Prerequisites: AN 102.   
Note(s): Fulfills non-Western Cultures and Social Sciences requirements.  
AN 365 -  Applying Anthropology  
Credits: 1  

A culminating experience of the anthropology major. Students discuss current issues in anthropology and explore the application of anthropology to diverse career paths. Specific topics and readings will vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: Senior standing as an anthropology major.   
Note(s): Must be taken fall semester, senior year. Course is offered S/U only.  
AN 366 -  Presenting Anthropology  
Credits: 1  

A coda experience for students who want the challenge of turning an original anthropological research project into a professional oral presentation for a public audience. The presentation includes text and visual material. Students develop an abstract, create a formal presentation with appropriate supporting media, and present in a public forum. Students address the broader significance of their research in the presentation, and the relevance will be demonstrated in the forum for presentation. At the end of the course, each student submits a portfolio with an intellectual autobiography reflecting on the way their research bridges anthropology with their liberal arts education, including areas of study outside anthropology.

Prerequisites: Senior standing as an anthropology major and permission of instructor.   
Note(s): Fulfills Senior Experience Coda requirement.  
AN 370 -  Preparation for Senior Thesis in Anthropology  
Credits: 1  

Required for students who intend to write a formal thesis on a particular anthropological question. During this preparation period, students must develop a thesis statement, construct an outline, and document a literature search.

Prerequisites: AN 270 and permission of instructor.   
Note(s): Open to senior majors only. Students must take AN 370 the semester before enrolling in AN 373.  
AN 371A-D -  Independent Study in Anthropology  
Credits: 1-4  

Individual reading and/or field research in anthropology under the guidance of a member of the department. Students must be self-motivated and have a written proposal in hand. They must seek approval from a member of the anthropology faculty to act as advisor and instructor of record.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.  
AN 373 -  Senior Thesis in Anthropology  
Credits: 3  

Designed for highly motivated students who want the challenge of writing and revising a formal thesis on a particular anthropological question. Students work with the guidance of a project advisor and are expected to produce a major critical paper. As preparation for AN 373, students should successfully complete AN 370 during the fall semester of the senior year. With approval by the project advisor, students may replace AN 370 with AN 371.

Prerequisites: AN 370 or permission of the instructor.   
Note(s): Open to senior majors only.  
AN 399A-D -  Professional Internship in Anthropology  
Credits: 1-4  

Professional experience at an advanced level for juniors and seniors with substantial academic and cocurricular experience in anthropology. With faculty sponsorship and department approval, students may extend their educational experience into such areas as museum studies or work within appropriate state, federal, or human service agencies.

Note(s): Not for liberal arts credit.  
AN 399E -  Professional Internship in Anthropology  
Credits: 5  

Professional experience at an advanced level for juniors and seniors with substantial academic and cocurricular experience in anthropology. With faculty sponsorship and department approval, students may extend their educational experience into such areas as museum studies or work within appropriate state, federal, or human service agencies.

Note(s): Not for liberal arts credit.  
AN 399F -  Professional Internship in Anthropology  
Credits: 6  

Professional experience at an advanced level for juniors and seniors with substantial academic and cocurricular experience in anthropology. With faculty sponsorship and department approval, students may extend their educational experience into such areas as museum studies or work within appropriate state, federal, or human service agencies.

Note(s): Not for liberal arts credit.