Classics: Civilization (CC)

CC 100 -  English Vocabulary From Greek and Latin  
Credits: 1  

An exploration of the heritage of Greek and Latin in the English language, with particular emphasis on technical terminology from a variety of disciplines. Students will learn how to break down English words into their Greek and Latin components, and to generate English words from these same elements. This course is of interest to all students in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences, who wish not only to expand their vocabularies but also to understand the ongoing evolution of English.

CC 200 -  The Classical World  
Credits: 4  

An introduction to classical antiquity for students interested in ancient Greece and Rome, the impact of antiquity on Medieval and Renaissance Europe, and a general background in the Western tradition. This interdisciplinary course taught by a team of faculty members from several departments and programs includes studies in literature (epic, dramatic, and lyric poetry, and rhetoric), history and historiography, art and architecture, and philosophy. Students will hone their writing skills in Classics by composing and revising essays related to the three sub-disciplines addressed in the course: literary, historical, and art historical/archaeological analysis.

Note(s): Partially fulfills the writing requirement for the major. Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 220 -  Classical Mythology  
Credits: 3  

A study of the important myths in Greek and Roman culture, with attention to their religious, psychological, and historical origins. Comparative mythology, structural analysis, modern psychological interpretations and the development of classical myths in Western literature and art receive attention.

Note(s): Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 222 -  Greek Tragedy  
Credits: 3  

Readings in translation of some of the tragedies of Aeschylos, Sophocles, and Euripides in the context of Athenian society in the fifth century BC. Students will have the opportunity to write, produce, and perform an original tragedy based on Greek myth.

Note(s): Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 223 -  Society on the Stage: Greek and Roman Comedy  
Credits: 3  

Readings in translation of the plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence. Students explore both the origins and the fate of ancient comedy within the context of Greek and Roman society. Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to produce and perform one of the plays on the course reading list.

Note(s): Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 224 -  The Hero(ine)'s Tale: Traditions of Greek and Roman Epic  
Credits: 3  

Readings in translation of the great epic poets of the Greek and Roman worlds, focusing on a comparative study of the works of Homer and Vergil.

Note(s): Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 225 -  The Ancient Novel  
Credits: 3  

A study of ancient prose fiction with a focus on its multicultural scope, the use of literature as entertainment and the interplay of fictionality and historicity. Students will read the most important examples of ancient Greek and Roman prose fiction in translation while developing skills in literary analysis and interpretation. These include tales of extraordinary adventures, travel to distant lands, romance and fantasy. Reading will include works by Lucian, Longus, Achilles Tatius, Apuleius, and Petronius.

Note(s): Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 226 -  Greek and Roman Historians  
Credits: 3  

Readings in translation of the great chroniclers of history from the Greek and Roman worlds: Greek, the works of Herodotos (the father of history), Thucydides, and Xenophon; Roman, the works of Livy, Polybius, and Tacitus. The course will focus on the methodology of writing history, comparative studies, and modern interpretations.

Note(s): Counts toward the history major. Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 227 -  Race and Ethnicity in Ancient Greece and Beyond  
Credits: 3  

How did the ancient Greeks construct their "racial" and ethnic identity and why should "Ancient Greekness" matter to us living in America today? Students will study the dynamics of race and ethnicity in antiquity by comparing constructions of Greekness and Romanness with constructions of ethnic identities in ancient non-Western cultures, including the ancient Persian Empire (Iran and Iraq) as well as cultures of ancient Africa, specifically the Egyptians, Ethiopians, Nubians, and Libyans. Students consider ancient Greek evidence as well as historical and archaeological data shedding light on non-Western perspectives. Students will learn contemporary race theory and the difficulties and benefits of applying it to the study of ancient societies. Students will also examine the role of ancestry, language, religion, mythology, and literature (including historiography) in the discursive formation of racial and ethnic identities among the ancient Greeks and nearby non-Western cultures. Although centered in Ancient Greece, students will move beyond its geographical boundaries through examination of the Mediterranean culturally and its link to twentieth-century conceptualizations of race and ethnicity.

Note(s): Fulfills Cultural Diversity and Humanities requirements; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry and Global Cultural Perspectives requirements.  
CC 228 -  Ancient Rhetoric, Modern Politics  
Credits: 4  

Build Back Better. LAW AND ORDER! Whether it's a Tweet, a speech, or a campaign slogan, everything that we read, see, and hear from our politicians is an example of rhetoric. But what are the features of persuasive political speech and how do our current and future representatives use them? In this course, students will learn and apply ancient theories to the rhetoric of contemporary political campaigns in order to think critically about the aim of political rhetoric, who has access to which types of rhetoric, and how modern politics has helped shape our political and civic identities.

Prerequisites: SSP 100.   
Note(s): Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Bridge Experience requirement.  
CC 265 -  Topics in Classical Civilization  
Credits: 3  

Selected aspects of classical antiquity that embrace both the Greek and Roman worlds. Topics will vary from year to year based upon the instructor's specialization and interests. Students work on basic research, analytical, and writing skills. Courses may include Greek and/or Roman religion, lyric poetry, and early Christianity.

Note(s): The course in a different subject area may be repeated for credit. Fulfills Humanities requirement; fulfills Humanistic Inquiry requirement.  
CC 291 -  Writing in Classics  
Credits: 1  

Students will begin to learn effective writing and will fulfill the all-college Expository Writing requirement.

Note(s): This one-credit course must be taken jointly with a 200-level civilization course to fulfill the Expository Writing requirement.  
CC 292 -  Semester Project in Classics  
Credits: 1  

Students will complete a semester-length project on an aspect of Classical civilization. The project will be collaborative and may involve visual or performing arts.

Note(s): This one-credit course must be taken jointly with a 200-level civilization course.  
CC 300 -  Classics 300 Level Elective  
Credits: 3  
CC 365 -  Advanced Topics in Classical Civilization  
Credits: 4  

Selected aspects of classical antiquity that embrace both the Greek and Roman worlds. Topics will vary from year to year based upon the instructor's specialization and interests. Building upon the skills acquired in 200-level courses, students analyze primary and secondary evidence and conduct independent research in major writing projects. Courses may include such topics as women in antiquity, sex in the ancient world, classical poetics, and ancient historiography.

Note(s): The course in a different subject area may be repeated for credit. Partially fulfills writing requirement in the major.  
CC 371A-D -  Independent Study in Classics  
Credits: 1-4  

Individual research in any aspect of classics not available in existing course offerings, which results in a written work. Supervised by a member of the classics faculty.

Prerequisites: Approval of the director.  
CC 390 -  Thesis  
Credits: 3  

The senior student will undertake a substantial advanced research project in any aspect of classics, which will result in a written thesis of approximately fifty pages. Supervised by a member of the classics faculty.

Prerequisites: Approval of the chair.  
CC 395 -  The Classics Major and Beyond  
Credits: 1  

A transitional course in which senior majors reflect on their work in the Classics curriculum and look ahead to life as Skidmore graduates.  Working both individually and collaboratively, students will examine the relevance of classical studies to continuing intellectual, cultural, and civic engagement; explore options for future work and study; compile a portfolio documenting and evaluating coursework in the Classics major; and strengthen the presentation and communication skills essential to professional success. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing as a Classics major.   
Note(s): Must be taken spring semester of the senior year. Must be taken S/U.  
CC 399A-D -  Professional Internship in Classics  
Credits: 1-4  

Professional experience at an advanced level for juniors and seniors with substantial academic and cocurricular experience in the major field. With faculty sponsorship and departmental approval, students may extend their educational experience into such areas as education, communication, the arts, libraries, and law and government.

Note(s): Does not count toward the major. Must be taken S/U.